The aim of marketing is to make sales superfluous

There are myriad reasons why someone would buy your product. Is it the product itself? Is it the story you’ve told about your product? The story you’ve told about your customer? Is it the person who asked for the sale?

It’s possible that if your marketing is terrible, you’ll need to rely on your sales team. If your sales team is terrible, you’ll need to rely on your marketing. And if your product is terrible, you’ll need to rely on both. (And your customers will feel lied to.)

Peter Drucker writes that “the aim of marketing is to make selling superfluous. The aim of marketing is to know and understand the customer so well that the product or service fits him and sells itself.”

If your marketing is terrible, your sales team needs to do more heavy lifting. That’s true.

But the larger truth is that pitting marketing and sales against each other creates a false dichotomy.

This product will sell well only if we have good marketing. This product will sell well only if we have a good sales team.

The aim of marketing may be to make sales superfluous, but it will never achieve that goal.

Marketing and sales is not a zero sum game.

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